Posts Tagged ‘handspun’

Sneak Peek Angora baby sweater coming next week for sale here in the shop and on Etsy.

Angora Rabbit Fiber: Spun, Dyed, and knit by hand

Now Available to order

One of a kind Angora rabbit baby sweater handknit in the softest and finest handspun and hand dyed angora yarn. This is definitely next to the skin soft! An original design that I created just for this cardigan so it is truely a One of a Kind (OAK) garment. The front band features 5 handmade buttons. A very special little sweater that would make a wonderful heirloom quality gift.

SIZE: The sweater will fit a baby or toddler of approximately 6-12 months. It measures 21 inches around and 11 inches in length. weighs 144 grams or 5.1 ounces

order here

My new passion! Breed Specific and Rare Wool Breeds.

I have always been totally in love with wool – my number 1 favorite fiber without rival. This love of wool has risen to a whole new level of passion with my virtually “meeting” of Deborah Robson and becoming aquainted with her work with Breed Specific Wool and Rare Breeds of Sheep.

It all started with a free class on Craftsy Know Your Wool. Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in wool. This sparked some research on the subject of Breed Specific Wools for spinning and knitting and expecially the Rare Wool Breeds.

I found a few resources over at Interweave as they are the publisher for a lot of this work. Try a search for “rare wool”.

I now have a Video “Handspinning Rare Wools” and an ebook Selections from Handspun Treasures from Rare Wools (eBook)

The “Fleece & Fiber Sourcebook” is now at the top of my wishlist at Amazon.

I am still discovering new resources that Deb has had a hand in bringing to us and I just really wanted to give her a big “shout out” and thanks for this body of work.

Deborah has an easy and friendly manner as well as an obviously thorough knowledge of her subject matter. I find myself trusting and admiring the person as much as the work.

Choosing a fleece with contrasting colours. This one has just black and white in what seems to be equal parts – that’s very dark brown and cream, of course

The testing and planning for this project may just be the most fun part. I have now washed, carded or combed, spun and knit swatches (or small projects) from 4 of my stashed fleeces. I’ve been working with the multi coloured fleeces this time because I wanted some colour texture in my sweater. This one is a Jacob from Great Britain. It’s for Earl. I considered my choices for working with the stark contrast of the colours in this fleece. I could do a relatively homogeneous blending for a smooth mottled look, I could keep the colour separate and ply a white with a black for a ragg look, or I could try to keep the colours separate and use them to form some kind of colour pattern. I decided on the later and choose a random colour pattern as I felt it would be closest to the true nature of the fleece as it appeared on the sheep’s back. There are lots of grey fleeces out there, why make this one look like them?  In order to keep the colours separate they had to be plyed by the Navajo method. This produces a 3 ply yarn. I made mine a worsted weight (4 Medium) about 35 yards/ ounce and about 9-10 WPI. Although I love to card or comb by hand, I do use my roving carder for larger project where I really want to get on with the task of knitting it so that is how I’ve been preparing this one for spinning. I knew I had to be careful with any stark white areas as they would pop out visually so most of the white has some degree of black mixed in. Each time I load the carder it has some of each colour. It is in the carding, to a degree, but more so in the separating and arranging of the bats for spinning that the “painting” of the colour pattern takes place. I’ve been knitting each ball as it comes from the spinning wheel so that I have a feel for how I want the next colour pattern to work out. Updates Here

Woot! My Alpaca arrived today and I’m in heaven.

I ordered a few bags to start with just to see how I liked it and I will definitely be going back again. This is beautiful fiber from ladyolivia Alpaca Avenue  by Kerstin Kerr on Etsy. So soft and clean and very fine. It was easy to spin into a fingering weight yarn as 2 ply so I’m sure I could do lace or DK with ease even if I had to go to a 3 ply for Worsted weight.

Now, I just have to decide what to knit with it. Mittens or fingerless gloves maybe? ideas?

Loving this wonderful top I just purchased on Etsy from threewatersfarm !

I had recently signed up for a class on Craftsy Spinning Dyed Fibers on how to spin these wonderful tops and so, of course, I had to buy some. I got these 2 amazing colourways and a bar of homemade goat milk soap.

I got on the iPad and watched the class and practiced. It was my first time to try Navajo plying and I can’t believe how easy it is after I’ve been avoiding it for all these years!

I only have 4 ounces of each colourway so I started with a pair of mitts. I found the pattern on Ravelry, Cruiser by Cailyn Meyer. When the mitts were finished I still had quite a bit left but not enough for a hat so I made this headband to match the mitts (just made up the pattern as I went).

This set is for Libby and I gave it to her today. I really think she likes it a lot.

 

This is going to be a big hit! I love this pattern. pssst You can get it at Craftsy or Ravelry.

The very simplicity in knitting and wearing it will quickly make it the go-to pattern or sweater for all of us. The pattern I am working on right now is for infant sizing but I am planning to develop this knitting pattern for children sizes as well as adults and plus sizes.

The elegant look and simple styling of this pattern is apparent at first glance but the true beauty from the knitter’s perspective is the method and simplicity of knitting it.

It begins at the top with a very simple but surprisingly well contured hood and goes directly into the neckband and so forth down the body. The sleeves are divided from the body stitches to be worked after the body is finished and the underarm sts are picked up, thus eliminating any sewing or finishing other than one simple seam at the top of the hood.

Bonus: 3 needle bind off illustrated tutorial

I’m doing it in an amazing 50/50 blend of Merino wool and angora rabbit. You can’t see the cable detail at the raglan “seams” quite as well but the wonder of the angora more than makes up for this missing detail.

Sneak Peek Size

Infant – Small [Med, Large] approximate age  – 0-6 months [9-12 months, 18-24 months] Finished Measurements

Finished Chest:  21 [23, 25] inches – 54 [58, 63] cm Body Length: 10.25 [12, 14] inches – 26 [30, 35] cm Sleeve Length from underarm:  6 [6.5, 7] inches – 15 [16, 18] cm

This garment is designed with an easy fit, similar to a sweatshirt. Your new go-to sweater

Recommended needle sizes 4.5mm (US 7) 16-20 inch long circular needle (16″ is a better length for smaller sizes) 5mm (US 8) 16-20 inch circular needle set of 4 double pointed needles (dpns) in size 5mm (US 8) stitch holders or lengths of yarn stitch markers or bits of yarn Notions Gauge

18 sts and 24 rows per 4 inches (10 cm) in stocking stitch  on the larger needles.

 

I’ve made some progress. I have 10 projects posted on Craftsy and 9 Hand spun and handknit Baby Sweaters and 2 Baby Blankets for sale at My Etsy Shop.  I’ve been favorited and clicked on but no sales, not even a question. It’s just a week, perhaps I just need a bit more patience??