Posts Tagged ‘knitting’

I am just thrilled to be releasing the final edit of my latest knitting pattern for download.

“Atherton”  A Top Down No Sew Hoodie with Cable Trim for Kids

This is a design that is very close to my heart. One of my own personal favorites developed over years of refining the pattern to fit well, look good and be a joy to knit. Available now as an instant download Here

Also available at   Craftsy    Ravelry   Etsy

A versatile basic Hoodie Sweater Pattern to knit from the top-down all in one piece. For kids in 10 different sizes from 2T to size 16 or Adult small with about 4″ of ease for a comfy “sweatshirt like” fit. A Classic, timeless design with simple raglan cables and a new twist on construction carefully designed for smooth, uninterrupted nonstop knitting. One piece top-down construction helps you get the perfect fit every time. Knit it with or without the “Afterthought Wallaby Pouch” My kids actually love to wear this. It’s comfortable and looks great too.

This is a “Meditative” knit with easy repetitive shaping that flows without interruptions. Before you know it you’re finished and the only sewing to do is the top of the hood and minimal ends to weave in.

I find myself knitting this again and again with simple variations that make it new each time.  Make it a cardigan, lose the hood, add pockets or a stitch pattern for texture. Lots of ideas for variations included as well as a tutorial on an “Afterthought Pouch Pocket” that you can add to any knit.

You are unlikely to find an error now that this pattern has been thoroughly edited by “The TECHsorcist” – Technical Editing by Eleanor Dixon

Skills Required:

Working in the round on circular needles and double pointed needles; knitting, purling, increasing, decreasing; simple cable pattern

Sizes

Child Sizes: 2T (4T, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16) To fit chest:  21 (23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31.5, 32.5)”  [53.5 (58.5, 61, 63.5, 66, 68.5, 71, 76, 80, 82.5) cm] Shown in photo – size 6 with 4″ [10 cm] of ease. 

Finished Measurements

Chest at Underarm: 25.5 (27.5, 28.5, 29.5, 30.5, 31.5, 32.5, 34.5, 36, 37)” [65 (70, 72.5, 75, 77.5, 80, 82.5, 87.5, 91.5, 94) cm] Finished Length: 15 (16.75, 18, 19, 21, 22.5, 24.25, 26, 27, 28)” [38 (42.5, 45.5, 48.5, 53.5, 57, 61.5, 66, 68.5, 71)cm] Sleeve Length:  9 (10, 10.5, 11, 12, 12.5, 13.5, 15, 16, 17)” [23 (25.5, 26.5, 28, 30.5, 32, 34.5, 38, 40.5, 43) cm] Materials

Yarn Nancy Elizabeth Designs Custom Handspun Merino Wool and Silk  (1 oz/28g, 40-50 yds/36-46 m,  85% Merino Wool/15% Tussah Silk), 13 (15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 24, 26, 27, 30) oz worsted weight yarn [CYCA 4]

Red sample shown in Grevillea colorway

OR 640 (760, 850, 920, 1035, 1105, 1265, 1420, 1536, 1625) yds [595 (705, 785, 850, 955, 1045, 1170, 1315, 1420, 1500) m] of any worsted weight natural fiber yarn in stated gauge

Blue sample shown in Berroco Pure Merino in #8581 Regatta colorway

Needles

US size 9 [5.5 mm] or size needed for correct gauge US size 8 [5.0 mm] or 1 size smaller than gauge needles

20-32″ [50-80 cm] circular needles – both sizes (choose needle length according to the size you are making, must be shorter than the finished chest measurement and long enough to accommodate all of the yoke sts) double-pointed needles (set of 4-5) for sleeve cuffs – both sizes

Notions 8-10 stitch markers 2 stitch holders or waste yarn for sleeves Toggle closure or button (optional)

Gauge

18 sts and 24 rows or rnds = 4″ [10 c] in St st with larger needles after blocking.

Notes: Simple raglan cables enhance this classic all-season hoodie which is  worked in the round with basic shaping, easy-to-memorize stitch patterns,  and no finishing. Allow a generous amount of ease for a comfy, sweatshirt-like fit. Detailed instructions provided for ten sizes with plenty of ideas for variations and customization – knit it again and again without ever making the same sweater twice.

I thought it was time to post an update to “Spinning the Spotted Fleece”.

The sweater now has a name. It will be called Jacob. I will probably do a pattern for it after I’ve knit it in another colour pattern for variety.

I’ve had quite a few orders for handspun yarns so the knitting is coming along rather slowly. I’m at the neck shaping. We tried it on and it’s within an inch of exact measurements which makes me very happy. That can definitely be worked out with washing and blocking.

Choosing a fleece with contrasting colours. This one has just black and white in what seems to be equal parts – that’s very dark brown and cream, of course

The testing and planning for this project may just be the most fun part. I have now washed, carded or combed, spun and knit swatches (or small projects) from 4 of my stashed fleeces. I’ve been working with the multi coloured fleeces this time because I wanted some colour texture in my sweater. This one is a Jacob from Great Britain. It’s for Earl. I considered my choices for working with the stark contrast of the colours in this fleece. I could do a relatively homogeneous blending for a smooth mottled look, I could keep the colour separate and ply a white with a black for a ragg look, or I could try to keep the colours separate and use them to form some kind of colour pattern. I decided on the later and choose a random colour pattern as I felt it would be closest to the true nature of the fleece as it appeared on the sheep’s back. There are lots of grey fleeces out there, why make this one look like them?  In order to keep the colours separate they had to be plyed by the Navajo method. This produces a 3 ply yarn. I made mine a worsted weight (4 Medium) about 35 yards/ ounce and about 9-10 WPI. Although I love to card or comb by hand, I do use my roving carder for larger project where I really want to get on with the task of knitting it so that is how I’ve been preparing this one for spinning. I knew I had to be careful with any stark white areas as they would pop out visually so most of the white has some degree of black mixed in. Each time I load the carder it has some of each colour. It is in the carding, to a degree, but more so in the separating and arranging of the bats for spinning that the “painting” of the colour pattern takes place. I’ve been knitting each ball as it comes from the spinning wheel so that I have a feel for how I want the next colour pattern to work out. Updates Here

I don’t know about you but I am almost as opposed to finishing as I am in love with knitting. It took a lot of self-control but I managed to put a face on “Hello Kitty” today for my sweetheart Alice. This is her dream hat for this year and she really appreciates the stuff I make her. What an amazing girl she is.

I used Beadwhore Knitting’s pattern and it was very helpful. I just adjusted the stitches to my gauge and cast on. I used coins to help me visualize the best placement for the face and outline stitched around them to show me where to go with my stitches. It is *hard* to embroider on knitting! Let me tell you.

Loving this wonderful top I just purchased on Etsy from threewatersfarm !

I had recently signed up for a class on Craftsy Spinning Dyed Fibers on how to spin these wonderful tops and so, of course, I had to buy some. I got these 2 amazing colourways and a bar of homemade goat milk soap.

I got on the iPad and watched the class and practiced. It was my first time to try Navajo plying and I can’t believe how easy it is after I’ve been avoiding it for all these years!

I only have 4 ounces of each colourway so I started with a pair of mitts. I found the pattern on Ravelry, Cruiser by Cailyn Meyer. When the mitts were finished I still had quite a bit left but not enough for a hat so I made this headband to match the mitts (just made up the pattern as I went).

This set is for Libby and I gave it to her today. I really think she likes it a lot.